Journal cover Journal topic
Ocean Science An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Executive editors:
Eric J.M.
John M.
Ocean Science (OS) is an international open-access scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on all aspects of ocean science: experimental, theoretical, and laboratory. The primary objective is to publish a very high-quality scientific journal with free Internet-based access for researchers and other interested people throughout the world.
Highlight articles

We estimated spatial and temporal decorrelation scales of temperature and salinity in the Amerasian Basin in the Arctic Ocean. The estimated scales can be applied to representation error assessment in the ocean data assimilation system for the Arctic Ocean.

Hiroshi Sumata, Frank Kauker, Michael Karcher, Benjamin Rabe, Mary-Louise Timmermans, Axel Behrendt, Rüdiger Gerdes, Ursula Schauer, Koji Shimada, Kyoung-Ho Cho, and Takashi Kikuchi

A new density–salinity relation of standard seawater was developed based on highly accurate density measurements. The comparison of densities calculated using the new relation with those using the reference equation of state TEOS-10 showed significant deviations that are likely caused by accuracy overestimations of some density data underlying TEOS-10 and EOS-80. The new relation enables the determination of seawater density from salinity and vice versa with unprecedented accuracy.

Hannes Schmidt, Steffen Seitz, Egon Hassel, and Henning Wolf

A coupled model has been developed to study the interaction between the ocean and the Antarctic ice sheet. Simulations for present-day climate yield realistic ice-shelf melt rates and a grounding line position close to the observed state. In a warm-water-inflow scenario, the model suggests a substantial thinning of the ice shelf and a local retreat of the grounding line. The coupled model yields a stronger increase in ice-shelf basal melt rates than a fixed-geometry control experiment.

Ralph Timmermann and Sebastian Goeller

Some places experience double high tides, where the tide starts to ebb for a short while, only to briefly flood again before finally receding. The result is a very long high tide with weak currents, and is important for navigational purposes. The existing theory for when and where double high tides occur does not always capture them, and it can only be applied to double highs occurring on a twice-daily tide. Here, the criterion has been generalized to capture all double high or low tides.

Hannah A. M. Byrne, J. A. Mattias Green, and David G. Bowers

A new method of observing ocean heat content throughout the entire ocean depth is provided. The new method is compared with simulated ocean heat content changes from climate models. The comparisons are carried out in various depth layers of the ocean waters. It is found that there is excellent agreement between the models and the observations. Furthermore, we propose that changes to ocean heat content be used as a fundamental metric to evaluate climate models.

L. Cheng, K. E. Trenberth, M. D. Palmer, J. Zhu, and J. P. Abraham

Recent articles


New article processing charges for OS

05 Dec 2017

From 1 January 2018 Ocean Science (OS) will slightly increase the article processing charges.

New institutional agreement between the PIK and Copernicus Publications

24 Aug 2017

Authors from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) will profit from a new institutional agreement with Copernicus Publications starting 23 August 2017. The agreement which is valid for the first author enables a direct settlement of article processing charges (APCs) between the PIK and the publisher.

Update of publication policy

04 Jul 2017

The updated publication policy now is extended by the journal's open access statement, its archiving and indexing scheme, and explicit policies on corrections and retractions.

Publications Copernicus